lando the weaboo hacker is a user on cronk.stenoweb.net. You can follow them or interact with them if you have an account anywhere in the fediverse.

lando the weaboo hacker @techfury@cronk.stenoweb.net

youtube.com/watch?v=RNRYcsdoLq leave it to me to stream installing IBM i (nee OS/400) in Japanese set to Kyary

@djsundog (OLPC is what you get if you leave a project like "giving underprivileged children in developing countries computers for 'better education'" in the hands of the kind of engineers more interested in developing HW and libre SW than they are any form of plan to do with those computers, like a curriculum)

youtu.be/Kl08TvO0Bgw

Probably the first video I've seen on YouTube of Sun/Xerox/AT&T's old Open Look interface, circa 1990-1991. I shot this myself from my SPARCstation IPX. Very polished for the time, really.

qualcomm is the oracle of cellular

youtu.be/XOrlI65GazM
Dooping around DEC ALL-IN-1. Groupware for the 1980s! It's Very Business. Running on VMS 7.3 on a MicroVAX 3100-40 with a VT420 terminal

"WELCOME TO THE GROUPWARE PARTYZONE"

@rey @techfury @coryw its confidential so I leaked it. i'm the ed snowden of VAX office automation

ABOUT TO MAKE A FOOL OF MYSELF IN E-MAIL @calvin @techfury

ALL-IN-1, for maximum overbusiness on your DEC VT100, courtesy of @techfury

it's cool to see all this wacky stuff, but its conventions are.... weird. "GOLD KEY" is PF0/Num Lock. you kinda see why people wanted pull-down menus

cc @coryw

also cool: VT100 fullwidth, enterprise ASCII art, menus

more ALL-IN-1 stuff

I've yet to the scratch the surface, with stuff like DEC Notes (which has an X11 version, and would make great BBS material) and WPS (a port of DEC's word processing from the PDP-8)

$ sh sys
OpenVMS V7.3 on node HEHVAX 29-SEP-2018 00:09:02.49 Uptime 0 00:48:06

indeed, nothing does suck like a vax

<@techfury> @calvin: you steal the swayzie express so we can send itaniums across the border

黒糖さんのプロンプト好き

@amdt allegedly (I don't know for certain, @techfury can correct me) Fujitsu and/or NEC made domestic ones (or comparable machines that happened to run Lisp) - see fifth generation computing

that said, SMBX did have a presence in Japan