stenoweb\coryw is a user on cronk.stenoweb.net. You can follow them or interact with them if you have an account anywhere in the fediverse. If you don't, you can sign up here.

stenoweb\coryw @coryw@cronk.stenoweb.net

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Soliciting general recommendations/ideas:

I am eventually going to start running a server running AppleShare IP 6 as a server for vintage Mac files, email, and web hosting.

I have a machine, I need a SATA card and some fresh 2TB disks, and to set it up.

I also need a name!

Any ideas? It would be on a subdomain of either stenoweb dot net or 68kmla dot org.

It was set up temporarily using v dot stenoweb dot net, to stand for "vintage".

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If anybody needs an email account:

I run a server with Microsoft Exchange and SharePoint and some other file storage space on the domain stenoweb dot net.

Let me know if you'd like an account!

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cronk is running on fd.stenoweb.net/SitePages/TECT - let me know if it's weird.

Also, should there be like a server account (or should I make, like, a TECT Info account?) for announcements related to the server itself? Especially given that the server has to run updates once in a while, etc.

Spotify had a big ass breach. This morning? Log in, force a log out of all locations, and reset your passwords.

At least 4,000 accounts affected with passwords exposed in plain text.

Boost for visibility.

a friend of mine just contacted the wobscale NOC email with:

FLAC files of recordings of thinkpad system event beeps

The external disk I bought for backups of cronk on the new "definitely not literally a thinkpad" virtualization server I'm going to set up tonight is neat in that it's perfectly shaped to fit inside one of the really useful boxes. The size of a 2.5" hard disk would be good for a cartridge system of some sort.

Really, the intent /specifically/ to load up a big fancy GPU hurts things, I think. If you want "a computer" a Dell Precision with whatever CPU and graphics it came with, and an SSD, and some more RAM, is "fine" and will only cost a couple hundred dollars.

A contemporary Mac Pro will cost a couple hundred dollars and then need all those upgrades *and* a GPU upgrade to something that'll be a poor experience (no boot screen) to receive security updates.

Part of the problem with all of this is that in the USA, getting a Mac Pro costs, just guessing, somewhere between two and ten times as much as buying an equivalent PC, like a Dell Precision T5500, would cost.

(Not that the T5500 is a "good deal" just that the calculus does change a bit when you do actually save money by going for an older system.)

Update on this:

Someone's budget for building out a Mac Pro 5,1 was 1500 euros, which is approximately 1750(ish) US dollars.

For 1750 dollars, you can buy a Dell XPS desktop with a GTX1080 in it that will work well and outperform most if not all Mac Pro 5,1 configurations.

Workshopping an idea to @calvin

<coryw-p> ok I just had the worst idea and tbh I might just do it.
<coryw-p> reformat e520
<coryw-p> join to domain
<coryw-p> and then just fuckin' put cronk on there.

@calvin @coryw I say this as a long time Mac fan - at this point? I'd rather put the effort into building a killer Linux box :) MacOS X is becoming less and less developer friendly every day. My 2018 15" MBP with the !@#$@#$% Touch Bar makes me want to throw it out a third story window. What a POS. Oh and that keyboard isn't worth the powder to blow itself to hell either. Awful awful awful. How far they have fallen!

Like what's the justification for spending $1000+ on a machine and upgrade bits for it to be outperformed by something a few weight classes below it you can buy for the same or less?

Appropos of nothing you'll have seen: I'm still to this very day impressed by how much people spend on used Mac Pros from 2009 and 2010 and then upgrading them to look slightly less like they're ten years old, often in the name of "having slots" even though the slots do no good if you have to fill them up instantly to get USB 3 and slightly better SSD speeds.

I actually never posted that blog because the server crashed and I had to write about that first. Whoops, that'll be coming this coming week.

Interesting: thehelm.com

Via an IRC channel I'm in. On-prem email server that uses a VPN connection to avoid issues with having a public static IP and RDNS, and a subscription service to back up the contents of the device.

THis is similar-but-different to what I was talking about the other day. It's a little bit steep, but if all I wanted was email, this is less than my yearly spend on those IPs and the server hardware.

Ultimately, you'd have to beef up the program a lot and offer more tangible benefits to it, or hire testers again and let them be unionized.

Microsoft should do its part to ensure that SOMEONE takes the time to, say, install Windows 7, patch it up, enable KFR, put some data in those folders, then upgrade to the newest test build of 10, and make sure that didn't break anything.

And, someone should be paid to connect a web cam to make sure it works. (For example.)

I'm guilty of this BTW.

And, people who are "serious" about testing it follow Microsoft's recommendation to *not* use it for your day-to-day, which results in issues like the webcam thing, as seen in theverge.com/2016/8/19/1256278

Just generally Windows 10 testing is in a really weird place.

Microsoft essentially fired its software QA department because they tried to unionize. So, at around the same time, they created the Insider program to get prerelease versions of Windows 10 into more hands.

But, there's (as far as I know) very little information about structured testing. Each person tests what they think is important, or just uses it as their daily and hope MS is looking closely enough to get good data.

h/t @calvin

os2museum.com/wp/crazy-world/

Super interesting pair of takes on the "Windows 1809 deletes all your files" trouble.

It's hard to be on a "side" here because, yeah, you should be backing up your files, but also, if KFR is going to exist, it should probably be tested extensively, especially in various upgrade and migration scenarios.

Turning off some of the VMs that can't do anything because the domain controller is down anyway, to save on IOPS for a few moments.